Our surgeons use the robot to perform some of the most complex and delicate procedures through very small incisions. Using high-definition 3D vision and a magnified view, the surgeon controls the system, which translates his or her hand movements into smaller, more precise movements of tiny instruments inside the body.

Robotic-assisted surgery is like other minimally invasive surgery, in that instruments and cameras are inserted through small incisions. What is different is that the surgeon sits at a console next to the patient.

Though it is often called a “robot,” the robotic surgery system cannot act on its own—surgery is performed 100% by our talented surgeons.

How it Works

The surgeon looks into a viewfinder at the three-dimensional, high-quality image sent back by the cameras and works the surgical "arms."

The quality of the images and precise movement of the surgical arms essentially puts the surgeon right next to the area in which he or she is operating.

  • The surgeon’s hands move the controllers, which manipulate the instruments inside the patient’s body
  • The instruments are "wristed" and have a greater range of motion than the human wrist
  • The surgeon makes a precise cutting or sewing motion at the console
  • The computer software translates these movements to allow the instruments to do exactly the same thing inside the patient’s body — without any potential hand tremor